Hear Native Americans Tell Their Story

 

{Links are always at the end to reduce distractions, with the exception of the giveaway link.}

 

Each year in November is Native American Heritage Month, and I'm dedicating the entire month to help a Native American writer publish and launch her poetry book! It's my pleasure to offer this Giveaway as a way to say thank and amplify her forgotten and marginalized voice.

 

You are not forgotten.

 

You are not extinct.

 

Native American Heritage Month is not just about this month, but all year long, every season, every life cycle, the extensive history and contributions of Native people remind us all to respect and celebrate the persistence, strength and beauty of the many Indigenous cultures, traditions, and histories and to acknowledge, "You are still here!"

 

"It is also a month that perpetuates the dehumanization, erasure, and stereotyping of Native people, and rewrites Native history each year through thanksgiving myths" - @theconsciouskid.

 

But it doesn't have to be this way. When we notice and honor the culture, background, and worldview of Indigenous voices, it will allow the radical roots of God's shalom, hospitality, and love to run deep and deeper still in our prayers and our practices.

 

Ponder how these voices of authors and artisans shape your view of the image of God.

 

Indigenous Authors

 

 

Fry Bread - A Native American Family Tradition written by Kevin Noble Maillard, a member of the Mekusukey band of the Seminole Nation tribe. He creates a powerful meditation on the food as “a cycle of heritage and fortune.”

 

 

 

In the final pages, Maillard wrote that:

 

"Most people think Native Americans always have brown skin and black hair. But there is an enormous range of hair textures and skin colors. Just like the characters I this book, Native people may have blonde hair or black skin, tight cornrows or a loose braid. This wide variety of faces reflects a history of intermingling between tribes and also with people of European, African, and Asian descent."

 

Kaitlin’s new book Native comes out May 5, 2020. Native is about identity, soul-searching, and being on the never-ending journey of finding ourselves and finding God. As both a member of the Potawatomi Nation and a Christian, Kaitlin Curtice offers a unique perspective on these topics. In this book, she shows how reconnecting with her Native American roots both informs and challenges her Christian faith.
 

 

 

“Glory Happening” is a stunner of a debut, every sentence a feast for the senses. By the time you reach the last page, you will have kicked off your shoes, knowing you tread on holy ground...

 

With the insights of a prophet and the attention of a poet, Kaitlin Curtice invites the reader to see the world fresh, in all its everyday glory. You will never look at a sink of dishes, a mound of dough, a game of Rummy, or the family dog the same way again." - Rachel Held Evans, author of Searching For Sunday and A Year of Biblical Womanhood.

 

 

Amena talks with Native American author, speaker and worship leader Kaitlin Curtice about why the voices and leadership of Native leaders is necessary and important. Kaitlin shares about her book Glory Happening and how the process of laboring is important in many areas of our lives.

 

Support Indigenous Artisans

 

 

This is just one of the many beautiful pieces of Indigenous art. I bought this sisterhood cuff.

 

Indigenous Intentions is an online jewelry brand created with the intention of increasing awareness for Indigenous and Womxn causes. Our advocacy background drives our passion towards giving back to Indigenous Communities.

 

Jewelry is a beautiful part of our Indigenous culture and what better way to make an impact and invest back into the community than by launching collections with a philanthropist initiative #MoreThanABracelet.

 

We love creating traditional jewelry with a modern twist. Indigenous Intentions supports Indigenous and Womxn Artisans and Designers Worldwide. 

 

A portion of proceeds from our MMIW Jewelry Collections go to MMIWUSA. Communities helping communities is the goal. We have partnered with StrongHearts Native Helpline, Indigenous Peoples Movement and many more to come!

 

Are you planning to do a Land Acknowledgement?

 

Territory acknowledgements are one small part of disrupting and dismantling colonial structures. You may also want to get in touch with local Indigenous nations or organizations to build relationships and support their work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Links For Further Discovery

 

Buy Indigenous Intentions jewelry and follow them @IndigenousIntentions

 

Listen to the Amena Brown interview Katlin Curtice, author, speaker and worship leader

 

Visit Katlin's website

 

Recommended Indigenous Reading

 

Wirelesshogan Blog: Mark Charles’ writing journey began on a blog in 2008 while he and his family were living on the Navajo reservation.

Are you planning to do a Land Acknowledgement? Read this first

 

Native Land Territory App
 

A resource for parents and teachers American Indians in Children's Literature

 

Order farm products like indigenous seeds and/or learn about what makes Eloheh Farm significantly different than most other farms

 

Honor the earth uses indigenous wisdom, music, art, and the media to raise awareness and support for Indigenous Environmental Issues.

 

Subscribe & Listen to my Soul Care Podcasts:

Mohawkmomma Soul &  Miseducation of Mom Listen wherever you enjoy podcasts. (also available on Anchor FM)

 

Follow and support us on Patreon

 

LEAVE A COMMENT: I enjoy hearing from you!

 

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